Working With Those Who Have High Functioning Autism

If you find yourself working with someone with high functioning autism on some project or something, it is essential to be as clear and precise as possible when giving instructions and handing out responsibilities. Those with autism are remarkably able to focus in minute detail on things that grab their attention, and thus under the right conditions are great at getting things done. At the same time, we can have problems with generalities or instructions that require an “interpretation” of some kind.

It is imperative to remember clarity when working with those who have autism; we need clear and precise instructions that tell us what needs to be done and how. This is something that cannot be understated if a person with autism is confused about what needs to be done because the instructions were not given in a clear and precise enough way before everyone involved in a project/job goes about getting it done. The autistic person will only do what he/she understands he/she is told needs to be done. Or he/she won’t start until he gets a clear understanding and will keep trying to get it until he/she does.

The beautiful thing about those with high functioning autism when it comes to working with others is that we tend to pursue getting clear and precise instructions very thoroughly. If we do not understand something, we will seek to understand it in the best way and as quickly as possible. If something is not clear to us we seek clarity, so you usually do not need to worry about or going out of your way too much in making sure everything is clear and understood to those with autism, we will let you know if we do not and just what needs to be clarified.

Even though those with high functioning autism should be more than able to let you know if there is anything to be clarified before you and they get started on whatever it is you will be doing, that does not mean you can ultimately let the matter be. You do need to be aware of those who are autistic that you are working with. You need to know just what their individual needs are because though we are autistic and do fit a general pattern of behavior, the same can be said for you and every other human on the planet. We autistics are human too and individuals especially and thus have our own needs. While those with autism can pay attention to detail and will seek clarity and understanding when needed, we all have our different levels of detailed attention care and just what makes us focus on the aspects.

Thus, the reason for you to be acutely aware of just who you are working with if they are in any way autistic and how instructions and responsibilities are given out. As long as you do that, you will have no problem working with those who have high functioning autism, and perhaps you will even be grateful for it, for they (we) may spot issues that you and others have not.

Autism Is Not A Hindrance​, It Is Just Plain Awkward

This response to the one-word prompt “Awkward” by “The Daily Post.”

For those who have to live with “Autism, can be and often is, no matter how one deals with it and strange. As I have mentioned previously on this blog, I have been diagnosed with “High Functioning Autism.” Although, I suspect that when I was growing up (I am 31) it was always that spectrum level.

I perhaps had a slightly lower function spectrum of , for growing up was definitely always socially awkward for me; I was still aware of my differences compared to others (I was never officially diagnosed, only thought to have some form of Autism as a kid). Now that I know that “my difference” was and is because of my autism, it has made going about my life so much better and more comfortable. My autism (my difference) is not nor has ever been a handicap or , but is very much a part of me and a good/useful part.

Because of my autism, I see things and think of things differently than most people. That is a gift, to be able to view the world through different lenses than most would; it opens a whole lot of new opportunities. Yet, autism doesn’t come without its challenges, which bottom line can be summed up in just plain awkwardness.

It is awkward to be in social situations and not know how to respond and act (responding one way and everyone looking at you like you have lost your mind). It is awkward to have a deep conversation on a particular subject while your mind keeps going a mile a minute thinking up all the connecting topics and/or ideas related to such.

From what I have come to understand when it comes to social situations and behavior most people do not have to put too much “active thought” into it. That is not so with me. I have to constantly be in “active thought mode” to govern my thoughts and behavior; rarely if ever being on “auto-pilot” (my subconscious). So yes, while having Autism is not a hindrance, it is very much an awkward experience!

What are your thoughts on this subject? Please do share them; they are very much wanted.