Why Hiding From A Problem Does Not Work?


For those who have to live with “Autism,” it can be and often is no matter how one deals with it #a difficult road to travel. Even for those who have seemed to have made something of themselves and “have a life” still have to deal with their autism every day of their lives. They did #not get over it or somehow “cure” themselves.

No, instead we have embraced our Autism as a part of who we are!

As I have shared in previous posts, I am currently diagnosed with “high functioning autism” which means, for the most part, I am able to function in the world regularly, but do face some difficulties when it comes socialization. These difficulties for me at least include picking up on social cues and focusing on others in social situations among a few other things.

I am currently at the point where in most situations, my autism #does not limit me as it once did because I recognize #why I have the difficulties that I do and can adjust myself and my life accordingly. Because I know of and acknowledge my autism, I know that it is not a curse, burden, etc.. but a gift.

Yes, because of my autism I have a lot more trouble communication and getting to know others than most people do; yet at the same time, I am more able to spot things in my environment that others may not or at least quicker than most do. I see connections easily. I am able to remember a whole lot of what for most people would be insignificant details #from past conversations and such. And though I have more trouble in recognizing social cues than most do, as a trade-off I believe, I am a little more empathic to other’s emotions than most other men are.

The thing is if I had not embraced my autism and acknowledged it I would most likely not have realized the benefits that I get because of my autism, but would only see the negatives associated with it. Because I would have just “seen” the negatives of my autism, and continued to have viewed it as a burden to do away with instead of working with it.

My autism is starting to really no longer be a “#problem” in my life because I no longer recognize it as such. I still have to deal with it, make no mistake, but it is no burden for me. This I believe is the key for not just an autistic person, but for anyone with a so-called “problem” no matter what it is. We need to stop seeing the “problems” life throws at us as burdens to be rid of, and more as challenges to #work with and around of.

I have embraced my “problem” as a part of who I am and as a blessing, not a curse; have you?

 

What are your thoughts and views on this topic? Please do share them all are welcomed and wanted. 

 

 

Remove Emotion From Debates


This is a response to #the one-word prompt “Thwart” by “The Daily Post.”

In the wake of the Parkland Florida school shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School which killed 17 people, there has been a considerable nationwide #debate #on how to better protect our schools and children in them. Some of it has been good and productive, but a lot of it has just been “noise” that is really only inflaming passions on all sides of the “political spectrum but having little actual productive results.

There has been new legislation passed by some state legislatures to answer some of the perceived weaknesses in school security. In Florida’#s case, it is a mixed bag with a lot of good things being done but also a lot of “showboating” (as is the case whenever politicians get involved). While the legislation does carry some new rules for dealing with handling mental illness and its treatment it also bans the buying of guns till the age for 21 (it was previously and is in most of country 18).

The call for banning gun sells until 21 years of age ignore the fact that most teenage shooters unlike the one in the Parkland Florida shooting do not own their own guns but take them from home, i.e. parents or relatives who do. Thus, banning the sell of guns until age 21 won’t do anything in #reducing the risks to shooting in our schools.

Those who advocate for tougher/more gun control laws always use the term “sensible” in describing just what they want. A gun control measure can only be called “sensible” if it actually does or makes a considerable effort to the objective it would be put in place to accomplish. How can the measure just mention contribute to our preventing more school #shootings if the majority of teen/school shooters don’t buy the guns they use to shoot up schools?

Unfortunately, this detail largely escapes the ongoing debate of the issue above because of the raw emotions evolved and the very little actual, rational thinking among those partaking in the debate on both sides. Everyone wants to just “do something” to keep our schools and children safe. Yet, that there is the problem, our need to “do something, anything.” Just “doing something” will not help solve this or problem. Solutions need to be concrete and precisely targeted in order to have the best results.

The only way we as a nation and as a people are going to be able to come up with solutions to better protect against school shootings (any mass shootings) is to #remove our emotions #from the actual decision process. They may be good for the initial call to action, beyond that they always only cause more harm than good.

What are your thoughts and viewpoints on this issues? Please do share them; all are welcomed and wanted.